Washington-Post Say her name: Dr. Susan Moore Op ed about the life and death of Dr. Susan Moore, a black family physician who died of COVID in December, after recording a post relating her racist treatment while a patient.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoDecember 28, 2020Topics: / Keywords: / /
Washington-Post PPE-clad doctor comforts lonely elderly covid 19 patient The doctor's new role: family member, hug, hand...heartbreaking photo shows PPE-clad doctor comforting lonely, elderly covid-19 patient
Contributor: Francesca CiminoDecember 28, 2020Topics: / / Keywords: / /
nejm_logo1a Reentry This is a NEJM perspective piece written by a palliative care doctor in NYC in light of the COVID pandemic. A snippet: "From March to June 2020, I led a palliative care team embedded in our hospital’s Covid ICU. We spoke to countless families over the phone and by Zoom calls to tell them their loved ones were critically ill, getting sicker, and eventually, dying. When the prognosis seemed dire, we recommended transitioning to comfort-focused care. And in patients’ final hours and days, we held iPads at their bedsides so that family members around the world could say goodbye."
Contributor: Francesca CiminoDecember 22, 2020Topics: / / Keywords: / /
twitter #GoldenGirls A doctor from Grady Primary Care in Atlanta, GA shares a twitter thread of a patient conversation - an example about how reactions, listening, and empathy made all the difference.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoAugust 17, 2020Topics: / /
tal-image This American Life: The Test The coronavirus has now fully arrived in the United States. This week, stories of people trying to rise to that challenge, in some pretty extreme situations.
Contributor: Adam SapersteinApril 7, 2020Topics: / / / / / / /
new-york-times-logo-270x270 It’s a Terrible Day in the Neighborhood, and That’s O.K. - (aka why we do reflective practice) Fred Rogers’s belief that we should validate emotions, not suppress them, is wisdom for all ages. This is why we do a course on Reflective Practice. We have feelings - and it turns out, it's ok.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoDecember 30, 2019Topics: / / /
thriving-in-scrubs Thriving in Scrubs: How Much Time Do I Have, Doctor? Fictional accounts of medical encounters often feature the conversation when a patient asks their doctor to predict the outcome of their disease. Doctors in real life have to answer these questions, too, but without the benefit of a pre-written script. Thinking about prognostication means trying to answer difficult questions, but more importantly trying to get to the heart of what the patient may really be wondering. It’s about trying to connect with the heart of what patients need in times of uncertainty about their health. It’s also about understanding how these conversations affect us doctors as people who struggle with some of the same questions ourselves.
Contributor: Adam SapersteinOctober 30, 2019Topics: / / / / / / Keywords: /
thriving-in-scrubs Thriving in Scrubs: Normal People At some point in their education, doctors start talking about “normal people” with a mixture of envy and curiosity. Why do doctors feel this distance from others, and from the parts of their own selves outside of their profession? We talk to Nicole, Sarah and Emma, three OBGYN residents at different stages of training about how they recognize, love and forgive the normal parts of themselves. Spoiler alert: it’s all about the friends who keep us from feeling alone.
Contributor: Adam SapersteinOctober 30, 2019Topics: / / Keywords: / / /
on being One family's struggle with schizophrenia Krista Tippett talks with a family struggling with schizophrenia. This is a listen or a read (transcript)
Contributor: Francesca CiminoMarch 6, 2019Topics: / / Keywords: / /
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