NY_Mag_com_lockup Myths about physical racial differences were used to justify slavery — and are still believed by doctors today.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoAugust 17, 2019Topics: /
Washington-Post Suicide in Veterinarians has become a growing problem Vets, like other medical professionals, enter the field because of their compassion for treating the lives of animals. That same drive and spirit of competition can also lead to compassion fatigue, burnout and depression. Their proximity with death - the regular task of euthanasia of animals - also sets up them to have access to tools for suicide. It's a growing crisis.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoJanuary 29, 2019Topics: / / / / / / Keywords: / /
TEDx We train soldiers for war; let's train them to come home too. (10min) TedTalk -- Before soldiers are sent into combat, they're trained on how to function in an immensely dangerous environment. But they also need training on how to return from the battlefield to civilian life, says psychologist Hector Garcia. Applying the same principles used to prepare soldiers for war, Garcia is helping veterans suffering from PTSD get their lives back.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoJanuary 29, 2019Topics: / / / / Keywords: / / /
NPR Social stigma makes the opioid crisis hard to confront (7min) There are many reasons why the opioid crisis is so hard to confront. One of them is social stigma. It often extends beyond users themselves, to their families. People see addiction as a moral weakness, and by extension, the moral weakness of their families.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoNovember 1, 2018Topics: / / Keywords: / / /
Washington-Post When drinking ruins your liver - should you qualify for a transplant? When patients develop alcohol liver disease, they are often forced to wait 6 months to prove they can abstain from alcohol before they will be considered for a transplant. Is that a fair amount of time? Is that a fair practice at all?
Contributor: Francesca CiminoOctober 3, 2018Topics: / / / / Keywords: / / /
healthaffairs Withholding surgery: How gaps in policy fail people who inject drugs A recent New York Times article described a harrowing situation faced by some people who inject drugs and develop endocarditis, a life-threatening infection caused by bacteria that enter the bloodstream and settle in the heart. The article described doctors in Tennessee deciding whether to perform repeat costly heart surgeries on patients who were re-infected with endocarditis as a result of ongoing illicit drug use—and at times declining to operate. There are policy failures that are to blame, too, for how and why resources are allocated this way. This looks at those failures and how our bias influences both the policies and how they are applied.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoOctober 3, 2018Topics: / / / Keywords: / / /
New York Times Injecting Drugs can ruin a heart - how many second chances should a user get? A life-threatening heart infection afflicts a growing number of people who inject opioids or meth. Costly surgery can fix it, but the addiction often goes unaddressed.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoOctober 3, 2018Topics: / / / / Keywords: / / / /
huffpost Everything you know about obesity is wrong 15min read - A description of obesity, weight bias, fat shaming, and a bunch of the consequences from it. A popular article, not a research article, but a comprehensive look at the topic.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoSeptember 20, 2018Topics: / / Keywords: / / / /
Atlantic When a Child Says She's Trans An article about how a child and her family is managing the idea of Claire being transgender.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoJuly 19, 2018Topics: / / /
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