I'll Get That Checked Out Soon In busy professional lives, and in an area where burnout is a hot-button item, our lack of self-care can lead to health care practitioners not really practicing what they preach. The consequences can be fatal.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoSeptember 10, 2019Topics: / / Keywords: / /
The New Yorker Letting go What should medicine do when it can't save you? Dr. Atul Gawande examines the way doctors try to approach death and dying - sometimes well, often inadequately.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoDecember 5, 2018Topics: / / / Keywords: / / /
New York Times How long have I got left? A young neurosurgeon describes his struggle with living and dying, in the framework of incurable cancer.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoDecember 5, 2018Topics: / / / Keywords: / / / /
cnn What happens when a patient says, "Doc, help me die." Mercy, compassion - does this fade at the end of life? Does ending a life conflict with our values as physicians? Read for one physician's perspective.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoApril 2, 2018Topics: / / / / / / Keywords: / / / /
Strong backs, soft fronts, wild hearts You can listen or read the transcript of the podcast -- discussion of belonging, race, the shields we put up that interfere with our conversation and how to overcome.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoMarch 12, 2018Topics: / / / / / / / / / Keywords: / / / / / /
I lied to my patient, and she was thankful A millennial physician chooses to postpone the truth for her patient...here's why.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoJanuary 28, 2018Topics: / / / / / / Keywords: / /
hidden Try a Checklist (NPR's Hidden Brain Series) A look inside the operating room with Atul Gawande — and reflection about a 1930s plane crash that inspired his obsession with checklists — as the podcast explores the subtle biases that cause very smart and very skilled people to become their own worst enemies.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoOctober 31, 2017Topics: / / / / / / / Keywords: /
Washington-Post The Case that Shook Medicine Libby Zion's death created a whirlwind of change that translated into looking at how doctors are trained, what kind of hours they keep, and how that translates into patient safety. This is the original story.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoOctober 31, 2017Topics: / / / / / / / Keywords: / /
NPR Racism is bad for your health - 5min Across virtually every medical intervention, from the most simple medical treatments to the most complicated treatments, blacks and other minorities receive poorer-quality care than whites. African-Americans who are college-educated do more poorly in terms of health than whites who are college-educated. And these racial differences in the quality and intensity of care persist for African-Americans irrespective of the quality of insurance that they have, irrespective of their education level, irrespective of their job status, irrespective of the severity of disease.
Contributor: Francesca CiminoOctober 30, 2017Topics: / / / / Keywords: / /